Department of English Language and Literatures

University Writing Program

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About the University Writing Program

Fluent writing and critical reading are crucial skills for academic success, personal fulfillment, and civic participation. The University Writing Program at Wright State strives to develop these skills in every student, together with an awareness that different rhetorical situations require writers and readers to understand that purpose, audience, genre, stance, and medium shape whatever they write or read.

To foster these skills and understandings, the writing program teaches students:

  • Multiple processes of writing, from generating ideas and text through drafting and revising to editing and proofreading
  • Research methods and processes that allow students to participate in academic and civic conversations knowledgeably and ethically
  • Various genres of writing to give students multiple avenues for expressing their ideas through narrative, analysis, reporting, and argument
  • Appropriate use of media and current technologies of writing and networked communication opportunities.

Ultimately, the goal of the writing program is to promote students’ success in their studies and beyond.


Core Writing Courses

First-Year Courses

You will normally take one or more of these courses during your first academic year. You must earn a grade of C or better in ENG 1100, 1110, or 1140 to enroll in ENG 2100, 2110, 2120, or 2130. For a detailed outline of the courses' goals, see the ENG 1100 and 2100 Outcomes (PDF).

  • ENG 1100, Academic Writing and Reading (3 semester hours)
    This course introduces the basic elements of critical reading, analysis, and evaluation as well as important elements of academic writing.
     
  • ENG 1140, Intensive Academic Writing and Reading (4 semester hours)   
    This course introduces students needing additional instruction in writing to principles of effective written communication and critical reading. It stresses invention, drafting, revising, editing, and self-assessment, along with effective critiquing and collaborating.

Second-Year Courses

You may use any of the following courses to satisfy the requirements of the Core, but only one may count: ENG 2100, ENG 2110, ENG 2120, or ENG 2130. Typically, you may take one of these courses after you have completed at least 30 semester hours of course work and earned a C or better in ENG 1100. For a detailed outline of the course goals, see the ENG 1100 and 2100 Outcomes.

  • ENG 2100, Research and Argument (3 semester hours)
    This course adapts principles introduced in ENG 1100 to typical university writing tasks. It stresses communicating effectively within disciplinary contexts, reading critically, and using source materials effectively in argumentative and research writing. Typically, you may take this course after you have completed at least 30 semester hours of course work and earned a C or better in ENG 1100. For a detailed outline of the course’s goals, see the ENG 1100 and 2100 Outcomes (PDF).
     
  • Or ENG 2110, Research and Argument: Education (3 semester hours)
    This course adapts principles introduced in ENG 1100 to writing for educators. It emphasizes audience awareness, reflection, analysis, argument, research, and effective use of supporting source materials. Typically, you may take this course after you have completed at least 30 semester hours of course work and earned a C or better in ENG 1100. For a detailed outline of the course’s goals, see the ENG 1100 and 2100 Outcomes (PDF).
     
  • Or ENG 2120, Research and Argument: Health Sciences
    This course adapts principles introduced in ENG 1100 and equivalents to writing for professional audiences in the health sciences and lay readers. It stresses argument, research, and effective use of source materials.  Typically, you may take this course after you have completed at least 30 semester hours of course work and earned a C or better in ENG 1100. For a detailed outline of the course’s goals, see the ENG 1100 and 2100 Outcomes (PDF).
     
  • Or ENG 2130, Research and Argument: Sciences
    This course adapts principles introduced in ENG 1100 and equivalents to writing for professional audiences in the sciences and for lay readers.  It stresses argument, research, and effective use of supporting source materials. Typically, you may take this course after you have completed at least 30 semester hours of course work and earned a C or better in ENG 1100. For a detailed outline of the course’s goals, see the ENG 1100 and 2100 Outcomes (PDF).

Developmental Course

  • DEV 0920
    Some students may require additional instruction in writing and reading while completing ENG 1100. These students will be placed into DEV 0920 and complete that course together with ENG 1100 in the same semester. The goals of DEV 0920 are to help students pass ENG 1100 and to develop and strengthen reading and writing abilities as well as increase awareness of academic habits associated with collegiate success.

Writing Courses for Non-Native Speakers of English

  • ENG 1020
    Designed for low intermediate and intermediate level ESL students who need to work on the basics of sentence structure and paragraphing. Grades are pass/unsatisfactory.
     
  • ENG 1030
    Designed for high intermediate ESL students, this course is an introduction to the fundamentals of essay writing. It prepares students for the demands of college writing, emphasizing advanced sentence structure and style and organization, and development of ideas for writing. Grades are pass/unsatisfactory.
     
  • ENG 1100 for ESL
    Designed for advanced ESL students who must fulfill the first-year writing requirement and for other advanced students who wish to sharpen their academic writing skills. Letter grades are given.

Core Writing Placement

Wright State's Writing Placement Test is an online assessment tool used to determine the right writing course for you to take. It asks you to read a brief essay, write a summary of it, and then write an essay related to the essay’s topic. You have 12 hours from the time you begin the test to do the reading and writing and submit your work online. Your writing will then be evaluated by two or three faculty in the writing program. Based on your performance on the test or your ACT English or other standardized test score, you may be placed into one of several courses.

The goal of this test is to place you into the writing course you need to succeed in college. For that reason, cheating—asking someone else to take the test for you or buying an essay from an online service—is not only dishonest and in violation of the university’s policy on academic integrity, but it is also likely to lead you to failure if you take a course that isn’t right for you. Also, if you cheat, you will be referred to the university’s Office of Community Standards and Student Conduct for possible disciplinary action—not a good way to begin your college career.

 


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