School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA)

Sample Theses and Projects Completed by International and Comparative Politics Students

  • Carrie Arblaster, “The Local Politics of Global Trade: China’s Impact on Businesses in Southwestern Ohio”
  • Pablo Banhos, “How Does a Democratic Brazil (1985-2006) Contrast with Authoritarian Brazil (1964-1985) in Terms of Promoting Human Security?”
  • Selma Beliel, “Is Democracy a Pre-requisite for Good Government? An Examination of False Consciousness in Sudan”
  • Kyleigh Clark, “When Prohibition and Violence Collide: The Case of Mexico”
  • Matthew Conaway, “’Boys Will Not Be Boys’: Variations of Wartime Sexual Violence by Armed Opposition Groups in Sri Lanka, Sierra Leone and Nepal”
  • Joshua Cummins, “Hearts and Minds: US Foreign Policy and Anti-Americanism in the Middle East”
  • Kathleen YS Davis, “Human Trafficking and Its Presence in Ohio”
  • Abdourahman Dia, “Military Leaders-Turned Civilian Head of States and Democratization in West Africa”
  • Alex Elkins, “How the City State Fares Under State Capitalism in the PRC: Local and State-Wide Reform”
  • Afsaneh Haddadian, “Social Movements’ Emergence and Form: The Green Movement in Iran”
  • Daniela Haheu, “Local Public Administration and International Donor Organizations in Moldova”
  • Jennifer Hamilton, “Democratic Institutions in Fourteen African Regimes: Implications for Democratic Quality”
  • Kristen Johnson, “Uncivil Society: The Exhaustion of Democracy in Colombia”
  • Jeff Kempton, “The State of Chinese Nanotechnology: From Revolution to Modernization”
  • Ashley Kitchen, “When Laws and Representation are Not Enough: Enduring Impunity and Post-Conflict Sexual Violence in Liberia and Sierra Leone”
  • Jennifer Leapley, “Energy Politics: The Effects of Chinese Petroleum Diplomacy on US Energy Policy Objectives in Nigeria (1993-2010)”
  • Rachel Miller, “Political Party Transitions in Post-Conflict States: How Political Parties Reacted and Adapted During Democratic Transitions in Cambodia, El Salvador and Mozambique”
  • David Morrison, “Counterterrorism Policy Effectiveness in Dictatorships versus Democracies: The Case of Spain, 1968-2004”
  • James Mosher, “Democracy in Post-Orange Revolution Ukraine: Progress and Prospects.”
  • Joy Ndiangui, “An Analysis of the U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program: A Focus on the ‘1972 Burundians’ in Dayton, Ohio.”
  • Morgan O’Brien, “Religious Pluralism in Mauritius and Turkey”
  • Rafael Ranieri, “An Analysis of the Bases for the Endurance of Brazil’s Non-Consolidated Democracy in the Absence of Performance Legitimacy”
  • William Rief, “NGOs as Barriers to Development? The Case of Afghanistan”
  • Caress (Abercrombie) Schenk, “The Contributions of NATO to the Institutionalization of Humanitarian Intervention: The Cases of Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo”
  • Jacquelyn Schroeder, “NGO-State Relations: Freedom House Status and Coooperation Versus Conflict”
  • Marcus Scramoncini, “Propaganda Games: Berlin (1936) and Beijing (2008)”
  • Derrick Seaver, “The Power of Perception: Securitization, Democratic Peace, and Enduring Rivalries”
  • Brooke Shannon, “The Value of Deliberative Democratic Practices to Civic Education”
  • Brandon Snell, “The Origins of Ethno/National Separatist Terrorism: A Global Analysis of the Background Conditions of Terrorist Campaigns”
  • Carla Steiger, “Dams and Damned: Draining the Bucket Dry”
  • Foday Sulimani, “The False Promise of International Institutions in Building Stable Democracies in Third World Countries”
  • Shane Tomashot, “Radical Islamist Fundamentalism and Extremism and the Impact of U.S. Foreign Policy in Uzbekistan and Central Asia”
  • Matthew Wahlert, “Non-State Actors and Asymmetric Warfare: A New Paradigm for International Relations”
  • Crystal Whetstone, “Is the Motherist Approach More Helpful in Obtaining Women’s Rights than a Feminist Approach? A Comparative Study of Lebanon and Liberia”
  • Shana Wilkins, “Security and Freedom: A Study of Democracy, Terrorism and Public Opinion in Israel”