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This program is made possible, in part, by Ohio Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of  Ohio Humanities or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

A conference on historical, cultural, textual, and virtual encounters with Shakespeare, featuring keynote speakers:

  • Dr. Ayanna Thompson, Professor of English at George Washington University and author of Passing Strange: Shakespeare, Race, and Contemporary America and Performing Race and Torture on the Early Modern Stage.
  • Dr. Curtis Perry, Professor of English at University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign and author of Literature and Favoritism in Early Modern England, The Making of Jacobean Culture: James I and the Renegotiation of Elizabethan Literary Practice, and Eros and Power in English Renaissance Drama: Five Plays by Marlowe, Davenant, Massinger, Ford, and Shakespeare. 

This event also features teaching workshops by the professional actors of Canada’s Stratford Theatre Festival, the largest classical theatre repertoire in North America, and the Shakespeare Gala: An innovative soirée blending Shakespeare-inspired artistic encounters including opera, orchestra, period dancing, choral music, musical theatre, and dramatic performance.

On this page:

Shakespeare Gala: Artistic Encounters

October 21, 2016, 5:30–9:30 p.m.
Wright State University, in the dazzling new Creative Arts Center

An innovative soirée blending Shakespeare-inspired artistic expressions including opera, instrumental music, period dancing, musical theatre, and dramatic performance.

Features:

  • Vocal and instrumental music
  • Staged combat and interactive drama
  • Theatrical productions
  • Catered reception and cash bar
  • Renaissance dance

Featured Performers:

  • Stratford Shakespeare Festival actors
  • Nationally renowned stage performer Bruce Cromer, Wright State University Professor of Theatre Arts
  • Wright State student and faculty performers

Keynote Speakers

Professor Curtis Perry

Recovering Shakespeare's Seneca: Alterity, Inwardness, and Empire

Friday, October 21
1:45-3:15 p.m.

Curtis Perry is Professor of English at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and a faculty affiliate there in the Department of the Classics, The Program in Medieval Studies, and The Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory.  In addition to numerous articles, chapters, and edited collections, he is the author of Literature and Favoritism in Early Modern England (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and The Making of Jacobean Culture: James I and the Renegotiation of Elizabethan Literary Practice (Cambridge University Press, 1997).  Current projects include a book-length study of Shakespeare and the resources of Senecan drama, and editorial work on Volume 5 ("The Roman Plays") in a forthcoming revision of The Narrative and Dramatic Sources of Shakespeare.

Professor Ayanna Thompson

Encountering Othello Anew through the Deutsches Theater Berlin

Saturday, October 22
11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Ayanna Thompson is Professor of English at George Washington University, and she specializes in Renaissance drama and issues of race in/as performance. She is the author of Teaching Shakespeare with Purpose: A Student-Centred Approach (2016), Passing Strange: Shakespeare, Race, and Contemporary America (2011), and Performing Race and Torture on the Early Modern Stage (2008). She wrote the new introduction for the revised Arden3 Othello, and is the editor of Weyward Macbeth: Intersections of Race and Performance (2010) and Colorblind Shakespeare: New Perspectives on Race and Performance (2006). Professor Thompson has served as a Trustee of the Shakespeare Association of America and a member of the Board of Directors for the Association of Marshall Scholars. 

All conference presentation sessions are free and open to the public.


Teaching Workshops by Stratford Shakespeare Festival Actors

Professional actors of Canada’s Stratford Theatre Festival, the largest classical theatre repertoire in North America, will run interactive workshops each of the three days of the conference.

Workshops

Off the Page: Rehersal Tools for Literary Analysis

In this interactive workshop, artists from the Stratford Festival demonstrate some of the tools and rehearsal hall techniques that will make Shakespeare leap off the page for your students. We will tackle Imagery, Iambic Pentameter, Verse and Prose, and Principle Thought. 

The Interactive Shakespeare Classroom

This workshop will build skills and strategies for the classroom through interactive activities led by Stratford Festival artists. We will explore Shakespeare’s use of Punctuation, Rhetorical Devices, and the nature of lists.

Strategies of Shakespearean Address: Images and Movement

Artists will lead participants through a guided examination of the significance of address. We investigate the ways the Elizabethan world picture informed stage practice while exploring the inherent nature of movement within Shakespeare’s texts.


The Night That Never Existed

Saturday, October 22, 3:30–5:30 p.m.

The American Shakespeare Collective presents a new English translation by Rochelle Trotter of Umberto Robles’s award-winning one act play!

Don't miss this is a wonderfully creative exploration of what a night between Queen Elizabeth I and William Shakespeare might have exposed about the knowledge of love.

Robles is Mexico's most widely presented living playwright whose works have been performed in over 25 countries. 


October 20-22, 2016 - Wright State University

Full Schedule

Thursday, October 20

8:30 a.m.

Student Union Atrium

  • Registration
  • Information Desk
  • Survey Drop-Off

9:00–10:30 a.m.
160C Student Union (Apollo Room)
Restoration! Performance Panel

The panel will feature scenes from Restoration! and special insights from the director, Professor Stuart McDowell, who brought to life Nahum Tate’s widely popular 17th century adaptation of Shakespeare’s King Lear. The Tate version held the English stage as the definitive History of King Lear for 160 years.

10:30–11 a.m.
157B Student Union (Atlantis Room)

  • Coffee/Tea

11 a.m.–Noon 
156A Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Shakespeare in Performance: Local and Global
Panel chair: Lisa S. Starks, University of South Florida

  • Niamh J. O’Leary, Xavier University, “Encountering Shakespeare in Porkopolis”
  • Adam Shaeffer, University of Maryland, “A City for a Stage: The New York Shakespeare Festival’s Mobile Theater as Theatrical/Civic Encounter”
  • Eva B. McManus, Ohio Northern University, “Olympic Encounters with The Taming of the Shrew at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, 2012 and 2016”

11a.m.–Noon
156C Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Affective Encounters
Panel chair: Erin Kelly, California State University-Chico

  • Eric Brickman, The Ohio State University, “Laughter in the Abattoir: The Role of Humor In Creating Transpersonal Affective Complexity in Lucy Bailey’s Titus Andronicus
  • Russ Bodi, Owens College, “‘Play’s the thing’: Shakespeare’s Ludic Encounters”
  • William E. Grim, Strayer University, “Louis Zukofsy’s Lifelong Encounter with Shakespeare”

12:30–1:45 p.m.
Lunch Break

1:45–3:15 p.m.
160C Student Union (Apollo Room)
Off the Page: Rehearsal Tools for Literary Analysis 

In this interactive workshop, artists from the Stratford Festival demonstrate some of the tools and rehearsal hall techniques that will make Shakespeare leap off the page for your students. We will tackle imagery, iambic pentameter, verse and prose, and principle thought.

1:45–3:15 p.m.
156A Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Personal and Historical Encounters
Panel chair: William E. Grim, Strayer University

  • Stephanie Kucsera, Loyola University Chicago, “‘Thou shalt be welcome’: Encountering the Other through the Hospitality Tradition in Pericles”
  • Anna Ullmann, Loyola University Chicago, “Encountering the Past: Shakespeare’s Merry Wives and Historical Consciousness”
  • Humaira Fawad, Pakistan University, “Encountering Racism in Shakespeare: A Critique from an Outsider’s Perspective”

1:45–3:15 p.m.
156B Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Maternal Encounters
Panel chair: Niamh O’Leary, Xavier University

  • Anne McIlhaney, Webster University, “’Christen it with thy dagger’s point’: Maternal Mistreatment in Shakespeare’s Roman Plays”
  • Marybeth McDonough, Saddle River High School, “Encountering Shakespeare the Feminist through Mothers and Daughters”
  • Gabriel A. Rieger, Concord University, “‘Father, being weak, seem so’: Encountering Regan in the Tradition of the (Anti) Mother Goddess”

1:45–3:15 p.m.
156C Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Royal Blood and Bloody Encounters
Panel Chair: Sandra Logan, Michigan State University

  • Jim Marino, Cleveland State University, “Macbeth and the Eighth King”
  • Marcia Eppich-Harris, Marian University, “Hubert’s Encounters with Succession in King John
  • Elizabeth Williamsen, Minnesota State University-Mankato, “Bloody Encounters and the Body Politic in Richard II”

3:30–5 p.m.
160C Student Union (Apollo Room)
The Interactive Shakespeare Classroom 

This workshop will build skills and strategies for the classroom through interactive activities led by Stratford Festival artists. We will explore Shakespeare’s use of Punctuation, Rhetorical Devices, and the nature of lists.

3:30–5 p.m.
156A Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Noble Encounters
Panel chair: Curtis Perry, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

  • Elizabeth Zeman Kolkovich, The Ohio State University, “Queering Poins: Sexuality and Performance in Shakespeare’s Henriad”
  • Kaylor Montgomery, The University of Akron, “Encountering Female Friendship in The Two Noble Kinsmen
  • Sandra Logan, Michigan State University, “Shakespeare's Foreign Queens: Cordelia and the Friend/Enemy Distinction”

3:30–5 p.m. 
156 C Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Hamlet and Ophelia
Panel chair: Hope Jennings, Wright State University

  • Sandra Riley, University of Dayton, “Hamlet and Misogyny
  • Bethany Packard, Transylvania University, “Ophelia Lives! Encountering Lucibella in Henry Chettle’s The Tragedy of Hoffman
  • Christina Luiggi, Wright State University, “‘She May Strew Dangerous Conjectures’: The Political Sedition and Social Potency of Hamlet’s Ophelia”

Friday, October 21

8:30 a.m.
Student Union Atrium
Registration 
Information Desk
Survey Drop-Off

9–10:30 a.m.
160C Student Union (Apollo Room)
Strategies of Shakespearean Address: Images and Movement 

Artists will lead participants through a guided examination of the significance of address. We investigate the ways the Elizabethan world picture informed stage practice while exploring the inherent nature of movement within Shakespeare’s texts.

9–10:30 a.m.
156A Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Transmission and Intertextuality
Panel chair: Bethany Packard, Transylvania University

  • James Ross Macdonald, Sewanee University of the South, “Player Transfer and Textual Transmission in the Elizabethan Theater”
  • Lisa S. Starks, University of South Florida, “Protean Encounters: Ovidian ‘Personation’ on the Early Modern English Stage”
  • John S. Garrison, Carroll University, “Medea’s Afterlife: Encountering Ovid in The Tempest

9–10:30 a.m.
156C Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Subversive States in Shakespeare
Panel chair: Jane Wells, Muskingum University

  • Heather J. Macpherson, Worcester State University, “What Pleasure in Sleep? La Petit Mort, Freud, and the Loss of Affection in Shakespeare”
  • Drew Heverin, University of Kentucky, “‘He has our voices’: Encountering the Voice of the Roman Multitude in Shakespeare’s Coriolanus
  • Amany Elsawy, Alexandria University, Egypt, “Encountering Shakespeare’s Cleopatra: The Subversion of the Occident’s Thread of Objectification”

9–10:30 a.m.
157A Student Union (Atlantis Room)
Undergraduate Student Roundtable
Faculty facilitator: Gabriel Rieger, Concord University

  • Lauren Van Atta, University of Dayton, “Navigating a Fluid Space: How Deceit Reveals the Blurred Line Between the Homosocial and the Homoerotic”
  • Elizabeth Pedrotti, University of Dayton, “Hath not [an Italian] hands?” Shakespeare’s Statement on Italian Stereotypes and Gender Conceptions in Early Modern England ”
  • Thomas Slagle, Youngstown State University, “‘Awful Rule and Right Supremacy:’ Marriage Ideologies and the Instability of Patriarchy in The Taming of the Shrew
  • Marissa Marie Gray, Youngstown State University, “Still Life in Flowers: Ophelia’s Self-Immolation as an Act of Rebellion in William Shakespeare’s Hamlet: Prince of Denmark
  • Kathryn Kuchefski, Ohio Northern University, “Revenge and Titus in Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus
  • Justin Gillingham, Bowling Green State University, “Othello: A Racialized History”
  • Edward Probasco, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, “Encountering the Loss of Innocence: ‘Macbeth does murder sleep’”
  • Shubham Maini, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, “Bard meets Bollywood, A Site of Resistance”

10:30–11:00 
157B Student Union (Atlantis Room)

  • Coffee/Tea

10:30–11 a.m.
157A Student Union (Atlantis Room)

  • Smith Prize Meeting

11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
160C Student Union (Apollo Room)
Off the Page: Rehearsal Tools for Literary Analysis 

In this interactive workshop, artists from the Stratford Festival demonstrate some of the tools and rehearsal hall techniques that will make Shakespeare leap off the page for your students. We will tackle imagery, iambic pentameter, verse and prose, and principle thought.

11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
156A Student Union (Endeavor Room)
New Approaches to Much Ado About Nothing
Panel chair: Timothy Francisco, Youngstown State University

  • W. Reginald Rampone Jr., South Carolina State University, “Encountering Rites, Rituals, and Redemption at the Funeral Monument in Much Ado About Nothing
  • Hillary Nunn, The University of Akron, “Making Conrade Female: Balancing Gender in Whedon's Much Ado About Nothing
  • Thomas Flanigan, Miami University, “Claudio’s Penance: A Case Study in Shakespearean Character Reclamation”

11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
156B Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Madness and Ravishment
Panel chair: Crystal Lake, Wright State University

  • Chuck Conaway, University of Southern Indiana, “Rape, Revenge, and Miranda’s Rights: Tempestuous Encounters in The Lightkeepers
  • Vanessa Rapatz, Ball State University, “‘Some fit or frenzy’: Encountering Lavinia’s Madness and Ravishment in Titus Andronicus
  • James Newlin, Case Western Reserve, “‘A Natural Perspective’: Encountering the Reader in Twelfth Night and the History of Madness

11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
156C Student Union (Endeavor Room)
New Perspectives on King Lear
Panel chair: Marcia Eppich-Harris, Marian University

  • Wei Lu, Purdue University, “The Ethical Encounter: Levinasian Responsibility and Lear’s Redemption”
  • Robert Kroll, St. Clair County Community College, “‘Machinations, hollowness, treachery’: (not) Filming Orson Welles' King Lear
  • Jim Lewin, Shepherd University, “Shakespeare’s King Lear Encounters a New Millennium”

12:30–1:45 p.m.
160A Student Union (Apollo Room)

  • Luncheon (Registration Required)

1:45–3:00 p.m. PLENARY SPEECH
160C Student Union (Apollo C)

“Recovering Shakespeare's Seneca: Alterity, Inwardness, and Empire” 

Dr. Curtis Perry, Professor of English, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

3:15–4:45 p.m.
160C Student Union (Apollo Room)
Reconsidering Relational Encounters in Shakespeare
Panel chair: Hillary Nunn, The University of Akron

  • Michael Slater, SUNY Brockport, “Desdemona’s ‘Divided Duty’: Gender and Courtesy in Othello
  • Emily Shortslef, University of Kentucky, “Ghost Stories: Hamlet, A Mirror for Magistrates, and the Experience of Early Modern Tragedy”
  • Monique Pittman, Andrews University, “Color-Conscious Casting and Multicultural Britain in the BBC Henry V (2012): Historicizing Adaptation in an Age of Digital Placelessness”
  • Vanessa Corredera, Andrews University, “A Case of Three Desdemonas: Privilege and Intersectionality in Desdemona: A Play About a HandkerchiefGood Night DesdemonaGood Morning Juliet, and Desdemona

3:15–4:45 p.m.
157A Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Shakespeare Appropriation and Cultural Capital
Panel chair: Emily Isaacson, Heidelberg University

  •  Jim Casey, Arcadia University, “Bless thee, Shakespeare, bless thee! Thou art translated”
  • David McAvoy, Miami University, “My profit on’t is, I know how to curse”: Shakespearean Sassiness as Economy of Power”
  • John Higgins, Case Western Reserve, “Cultural capital and the production of value in Shakespeare in Love and Duck Tales

3:15–4:45 p.m.
157B Student Union (Endeavor Room)
American/Latin American Shakespeare
Panel chair: William Rampone, South Carolina State University

  • Tara Olivero, Ball State University, “Shakespeare and the Nineteenth Century American Middletown”
  • Jason Demeter, Marymount University, “‘That is Why He is Called a Poet’: James Baldwin’s Shakespeare”
  • Maria-Josee Mendez, University of Southern California, “Shakespeare in La Mancha and Las Pampas: An Analysis of Shakespearean Influence on Spanish Language Texts”

3:15–4:45 p.m.
157C Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Modes of Subjectivity and Intertextuality

  • Panel chair: Russ Bodi, Owens College
  • Erin K. Kelly, California State University-Chico, “Encountering Animals: Shakespeare’s Love’s Labour’s Lost and the Cowdray Entertainment (1591)”
  • Hue Woodson, Dallas Community College, “Modes of ‘Being’ in the Worlds of A Midsummer Night’s Dream”
  • Daniel G. Lauby, University of South Florida, “Shakespeare, Sidney, and Dickens: Early Modern Lyrical Encounters in Great Expectations”

5–9 p.m.
Creative Arts Center

Shakespeare GALA 
An innovative soirée blending Shakespeare-inspired artistic expressions including vocal and instrumental music, staged combat and interactive drama, theatrical productions, and Renaissance dance.

Saturday, October 22

8:30 a.m.
Student Union Atrium
Registration
Information Desk
Survey Drop-Off

9–10:30 a.m.
160C Student Union (Apollo Room)
The Interactive Shakespeare Classroom 

This workshop will build skills and strategies for the classroom through interactive activities led by Stratford Festival artists. We will explore Shakespeare’s use of punctuation, rhetorical devices, and the nature of lists.

9–10:30 a.m. 
157A Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Fragmented Shakespeares: Local Encounters with the Digital Bard

  • Panel chair: Carol Mejia LaPerle, Wright State University
  • Valerie Fazel, Arizona State University, “Digital Remix, Creative Collisions, or What You, Will Shakespeare?”
  • Louise Geddes, Adelphi University, “Unlearning Shakespeare Studies: Affective Readership and Fan Activism”
  • Noam Lior, University of Toronto, “Multimediating Shakespeare: Encounters on Digital Platforms"

9–10:30 a.m.
157B Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Reading and Writing With Shakespeare

  • Panel chair: Vanessa Rapatz, Ball State University
  • Emily Ruth Isaacson, Heidelberg University, “The Shakespearean Versus the Generalist: Encountering Shakespeare at the Small Liberal Arts Institutions”
  • Katherine Kickel, Miami University, “Shakespeare, the Liberal Arts and the Writing Intensive Classroom”
  • Brooke Conti, Cleveland State University, “‘I have enough, my brother’: Shakespeare’s Esau”

9–10:30 a.m.
157C Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Encountering and Responding to The Tempest

  • Panel chair: Timothy Francisco, Youngstown State University
  • Joseph Sullivan, Marietta College, “‘Why, that’s my dainty . . .’ : The Tempest’s Ariel/Miranda as Shakespeare’s Final Dissociated Daughters”
  • Lindsey Slanker, Wright State University, “Pocahontas and Shakespeare’s Ariel: The Politics of the Recuperable Female Native”
  • Jane Wells, Muskingum University, “‘Here is everything’: Theatrical Space and Creative Response in The Tempest”

10:30–11 a.m.
156B Student Union (Atlantis Room)

  • Coffee/Tea

10:30–11 a.m.
156A Student Union (Atlantis Room)

  • OVSC Board Meeting

11–12:15 p.m. PLENARY SPEECH

160C Student Union (Apollo Room)
“Encountering Othello Anew through the Deutsches Theater Berlin” 

Dr. Ayanna Thompson, Professor of English, George Washington University

12:15–1:45 p.m.

  • Lunch Break

1:45–3:15 p.m.
160C Student Union (Apollo Room)

  • Strategies of Shakespearean Address: Images and Movement 

Artists will lead participants through a guided examination of the significance of address. We investigate the ways the Elizabethan world picture informed stage practice while exploring the inherent nature of movement within Shakespeare’s texts.

1:45–3:15 p.m.
157A Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Social and Textual Encounters
Panel chair: Jim Casey, Arcadia University

  • Orde Levinson, Independent Scholar, “The Realty Dialogues, or Shakespeare’s Jewish Encounter”
  • Justin Kuhn, The Ohio State University, “Encountering Shakespeare in the English Republic: The Merchant of Venice and Aristocratic Republicanism in the 1650s”
  • David George, Urbana University, “Shakespeare: His Early Twenties, His Patrons, and His Colleagues”

1:45–3:15 p.m.
157B Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Selective Shakespeare: Justice to the Bard (and Adolescents) through Close Reading & Active Response
Panel chair: Nancy Mack, Wright State University

  • Angela Beumer Johnson, Wright State University, “Less Is Moor: Conflict and Connection in Selected Scenes of The Tragedy of Othello: The Moor of Venice
  • Rachelle Arnett, West Carrollton High School, “Engaging Students in The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet through Multi-Media, Performance, and Selected Scenes”
  • Jennifer Ostendorf, Wayne High School, “Delving into Characterization through Selected Scenes of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar

1:45–3:15 p.m. 
157C Student Union (Endeavor Room)
Encountering Race and Affect in Literature

  • Panel chair: Ayanna Thompson, George Washington University
  • Leah Dvydov, Cleveland State University, “Be it Worthy of Thy Race and Royall Sead”: The Biological Drive Behind Britomart's Love Quest”
  • Carol Mejia LaPerle, Wright State University, “Racializing Will in the Dark Lady Sonnets”
  • Anthony Guy Patricia, Concord University, “‘I have never much liked Shakespeare’: Encountering the Postmodern Shakespeare in Arthur Phillips’s Novel The Tragedy of Arthur

3:30–5:30 p.m.
160C Student Union (Apollo Room)
The American Shakespeare Collective

The Night that Never Existed 
A new English translation by Rochelle Trotter of Umberto Robles’s award-winning one act play. This is a wonderfully creative exploration of what a night between Queen Elizabeth I and William Shakespeare might have exposed about the knowledge of love. 

Scholarship Information

For questions about the conference offerings or the K-12 teacher scholarships made possible by the Ohio Humanities Educator Enrichment Grant, please contact Carol.Mejia-LaPerle@wright.edu A detailed schedule is coming soon.